• The Medical Rainbow

    The scars reveal the truth.

    Puberty is a tumultuous time in a child’s life, it is the biological right of passage that all children must go through to become fully functioning adults. It’s not easy, hormones, growing muscles and the maturity of the sex organs is a lot for children as they cross from childhood to adulthood. Until recently it was common knowledge that children do not reach adulthood until they go through puberty. Today kids are told they have a choice. They can just pause puberty and experiment with being someone else. They are told their sex is assigned. That their sex organs are removable and changeable. The one thing kids always knew before this decade was, I’m a boy, or I’m a girl. There is no right way to be a girl or a boy. Yet schools are teaching gender theory to children, that their bodies are wrong and pharmaceuticals and surgeries will correct it. Be anything you want. What does that really mean?

    There has been a sharp rise in teenage girls identifying as trans-men and non binary compared to teen males identifying as female and nonbinary. In general, teenagers identifying as trans and nonbinary is rising dramatically.

    “October, researchers at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine published a paper showing a 389% increase in gender-affirming chest surgeries performed nationally from 2016 to 2019 on patients under age 18. The total of 1,130 procedures during the period, nearly all of them for chest masculinization, represents a weighted estimate based on records from more than 2,000 U.S. medical facilities. Likewise, at least 776 chest masculinization surgeries were performed on patients ages 13 to 17 with a gender dysphoria diagnosis over the past three years, according to U.S. insurance claims analyzed for Reuters by health technology company Komodo Health Inc. This is probably an undercount because it does not include procedures paid for out of pocket.”

    Teenagers are bombarded with constant messaging. The phone, the internet, the school, stores, all full of colorful rainbows. Colors everywhere! It looks so fun, like bubble gum, and cherry pop. Everyone is partying, the drag queens are the clowns, and the colorful circus cheers, “be queer” as they twerk and thrust their busts and butts in the air. It’s quite a surreal scene. The message is your body is broken, your sex organs are a body part that can be removed or reconstructed. Being a woman is a caricature of a large breasted heavily made up sex object. Being a man is taking testosterone and amputating your natural breasts and being topless. Anime is everywhere. Avatars become part of the teenage persona online and correlates with the ideology that you can be anything you want including being the opposite biological sex you were born as. Pornography is rampant in Anime where teens enter a fantasy realm of cartoon porn. Parents beware!

    Reported by Reuters. Notice how they refer to she as he. She had her breasts removed. She felt uncomfortable with her breasts. Her mother gave consent and paid for her daughter to remove her breasts, is how it should read.

    Teenagers in the 2020s spend more time in front of a screen than any previous generation. Instead of being outside and pursuing real life things, they sit indoors on the internet, especially after COVID. What does all that time online do to the young adult brain? I remember hating my body as a teen, nothing was right. As time passed I grew into myself and became a woman. Would that have been possible for me as a teen girl today? Today’s teen is sold a lie that she can amputate her breasts and become a man. She can become her avatar! The pictures of pride celebrations blasted online are sad. Especially the photos of the topless girls with red scars where their breasts use to be. Breasts are not just blobs of skin that do not matter. The breasts of a woman can feed a child, they are part of the female sexual anatomy. There are nerves and glands in the breasts that are part of a woman’s health and her natural body. Breasts come in a all shapes and sizes. There are no “right breasts” to have. Removing them is a life altering decisions you cannot take back. Does a 13 year old understand that? Yes, they are operating on 13 year olds. We know this because of insurance company billing and the many stories from young adults operated on as children that now regret it.

    Yeet The Teets! Nip the Nips! This was a slogan promoted on TikToc by a plastic surgeon offering this surgery to teen girls. The doctor posted photos on social media of the girls she operated on post op. I guess it’s no surprise that there are many pride photos online of topless young women with scars where breasts once were. It’s a trend. What happens when the trend is over? Do young people really understand the long term? I didn’t that young. This photo hit me really hard. The young woman in the front bares the visible scars of a double mastectomy. She holds a sign of a homemade collage of kissing Anime characters with rainbow and equality stickers. Behind her is a woman I once knew, from a life I no longer know, in a city I barely recognize. The woman behind her survived breast cancer. To save her life she had to wean her baby and get a double mastectomy. How is it that 20 years later she can watch healthy young women remove their breasts in an attempt to be a man and cheer it on? The scars that are left in place of the young women’s breasts are real and speak a story of trauma not liberation and equality. A child looks from behind her, his face crinkled as he too must notice the red scars on her chest that the adults around him ignore as they cheer for the medicalization of human sexuality. How has society become so blind?

    By Jennifer Sparks aka J.Cherry

    Independent Journalist 

    Jennifer Sparks aka J.Cherry is an independent journalist, radio host, and producer. On the airways she was known as J.Cherry where she produced a popular local radio show, VOICE of the CITY, airing on WESU 88.1FM. There she conducted in depth and candid interviews with artists, politicians, authors, activists, scientists, and community leaders. In 2020 Jennifer left WESU to pursue an independent podcast where she could freely talk about controversial subjects. A mother and wife before being a journalist, she felt compelled to break free and dig into medical freedom, government policy, parental rights, public health, corruption, and big pharma. 

    Over the years Jennifer has been published in local newspapers as a freelance writer. Frustrated with being censored and not being able to publish the stories she felt were important and under reported, she began her own blog. 

    Her work can be found at jcherrrypresents.com and on Substack https://jcherry152.substack.com/.

    Links and References:

    https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/usa-transyouth-topsurgery/

    https://www.insurance.ca.gov/0250-insurers/0300-insurers/0200-bulletins/bulletin-notices-commiss-opinion/upload/Gender-dysphoria-male-chest-surgery-CDI-GC-opinion-letter-12-30-20.pdf

    https://wng.org/roundups/study-effects-of-puberty-blockers-can-last-a-lifetime-1617220389

    https://www.judiciary.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Bell-v-Tavistock-Judgment.pdf

    https://jp.reuters.com/article/britain-lgbt-transgender-idUKL8N2IH2ZI

    https://eje.bioscientifica.com/view/journals/eje/155/suppl_1/1550131.xml?amp;ssource=mfr&rss=1

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    Jennifer Sparks aka J.Cherry

    Jennifer Sparks aka J.Cherry is an independent journalist, radio host, and producer. On the airways she was known as J.Cherry where she produced a popular local radio show, VOICE of the CITY, airing on WESU 88.1FM. There she conducted in depth and candid interviews with artists, politicians, authors, activists, scientists, and community leaders. In 2020 Jennifer left WESU to pursue an independent podcast where she could freely talk about controversial subjects. A mother and wife before being a journalist, she felt compelled to break free and dig into medical freedom, government policy, parental rights, public health, corruption, and big pharma. Over the years Jennifer has been published in local newspapers as a freelance writer. Frustrated with being censored and not being able to publish the stories she felt were important and under reported, she began her own blog. Her work can be found at jcherrrypresents.com and on Substack https://jcherry152.substack.com/.
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